Skip to content

If By Rudyard Kipling And Bud Not Buddy Essay

GRADE 6

MODULE 6.1

Myths: Not Just Long Ago
Reading Closely and Writing to Learn

Module Description:
In Module 6.1, students study the purposes and elements of mythology. Students read Rick Riordan’s The Lightning Thief with a focus on the archetypal hero’s journey, closely reading the many mythical allusions. They also read complex informational texts about the elements of mythology. As a whole class, students closely read several complex Greek myths, and then work in small groups to build expertise on an additional myth. Students then develop their narrative writing skills as they create their own hero’s journey narrative.

MODULE 6.2A

Rules to Live By
Working with Evidence

Module Description:
How do people formulate and use “rules” to improve their lives and communicate these rules to others?  In Module 6.2A, students consider these questions as they read a variety of texts. They begin with Bud, Not Buddy, analyzing character development and considering how figurative language contributes to tone and meaning. They read closely Steve Jobs’ speech, focusing on how Jobs develops his ideas at the paragraph, sentence, and word level, and then analyze the poem “If” to compare and contrast how the novel and the poem address a similar theme. In an argument essay, students establish a claim about how Bud uses his rules.  Finally, students conduct a short research project related to their own “rules to live by” and write an essay about one important “rule to live by.”

MODULE 6.2B

Voices of Adversity
Working with Evidence (Drama)

Module Description:
In Module 6.2B, students explore the idea of adversity of people across time and place, and through multiple modes of writing. Students begin this module with a research-based unit on the Middle Ages. They break into expert groups to read closely about one demographic group in order to write an informational essay based on their research. Students then move on to read literature: Good Masters! Sweet Ladies! Voices from a Medieval Village, in order to identify the various adversities faced by this cast of characters and to examine the author’s craft. To conclude the unit students move into modern voices of adversity by reading  poems in the books Blue Lipstick and Technically, It’s Not My Fault, and then write their own text about adversities faced by sixth-graders.  

MODULE 6.3A

The Land of the Golden Mountain 
Understanding Perspectives

Module Description:
In Module 6.3A, students study how an author develops point of view and how an author’s perspective, based on his or her culture, is evident in the writing. As students read Laurence Yep’s Dragonwings, they analyze how Yep develops the point of view of the narrator, Moon Shadow. They also read excerpts of Yep’s  memoir The Lost Garden to determine how his culture and experiences have shaped his perspective as evidenced in the novel. They read accounts by people from the turn of the century in San Francisco, analyzing perspective and comparing the accounts to those in the novel. Finally, students write newspaper articles that convey multiple perspectives about life for Chinese immigrants in San Francisco in the early 1900s.

MODULE 6.3B

Sustaining the Oceans
Understanding Perspectives

Module Description:
In Module 6.3B, students continue to study how an author develops point of view and how an author’s perspective, based on geographic location, is evident in the writing. Students consider point of view as they learn about ocean conservation and the impact of human activities on life in the oceans. They read Mark Kurlansky’s World Without Fish, analyze how point of view and perspective is conveyed, and trace the idea of fish depletion throughout the text. Students also read Flush, a high-interest novel, and read excerpts of an interview with author Carl Hiaasen to determine how his geographic location in Florida shaped  the perspective evident in his novel. To conclude the module, students write an informative consumer guide about buying  fish to be put in a grocery store.  

MODULE 6.4

Insecticides: Costs vs. Benefits 
Reading for Research and Writing an Argument 

Module Description:
In Module 6.4, students consider the balance between human needs and environmental consequences as they read the novel Frightful’s Mountain and complex informational texts about the benefits and drawbacks of DDT. They learn how to trace and evaluate an argument in written texts and videos on this topic, and conduct both supported and  independent research.  Through structured discussions and decision-making protocols, students form their own argument about the use of DDT. Students then apply their research to write a position paper in which they support that claim with evidence.
​PCG's Paths to College and Career curriculum provides educators with lesson-by-lesson guidance to implement the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) for grade 6 English Language Arts (ELA). In grade 6, students build their ability to read closely, use evidence, write effectively and conduct research through the examination of a wide variety of fiction and non-fiction texts. Students explore mythology, social justice, the rules we live by, and build knowledge about environmental issues like pesticide use.  Here's some of what students read in grade 6: The Hero's Journey, Bud, Not Buddy, Dragonwings, Frightful's Mountain​.

Download the grade 6 curriculum map for a detailed overview of the grade 6 curriculum:​​​
Grade 6 ELA Curriculum Map.pdf
File Size: 272 kb
File Type: pdf
Download File


Primary Texts:
  • “Key Elements of Mythology,” Expeditionary Learning
  • “The Hero’s Journey,” Expeditionary Learning
  • The Lightning Thief, Rick Riordan
Number of Lessons:
40 lessons (including performance assessment)
Primary Texts:
  • Good Masters! Sweet Ladies!  Voices from a Medieval Village, Laura Amy Schlitz
  • Blue Lipstick: Concrete Poems, John Grandits
  • Technically, It’s Not My Fault: Concrete Poems, John Grandits
Number of Lessons:
40 lessons (including performance assessment)
This module is not available for purchase
Primary Texts:
  • Flush, Carl Hiassen
  • World Without Fish, Mark Kurlansky 
Number of Lessons:
40 lessons (including performance assessment)
This module is not available for purchase
  • Home
  • Resources
  • Social Studies 5
  • Social Studies 6
  • Writing 5
    • Fifth Grade: Extended-Response Essay, Text-Based, PART 1
    • Fifth Grade: Module One, Narrative Writing
    • Fifth Grade: Module Two, Writing Like a Scientist
    • Fifth Grade: Module 3A, Unit 3, "Sports and Athletes' Impact on Culture"
    • Fifth Grade: Module 4, Unit 3, "Writing an Opinion Speech"
    • Fifth Grade: Dream Unit
    • Fifth Grade: Extended-Response Essay, Text-Based, PART 2
    • Fifth Grade: Poetry
    • Fifth Grade: Reading Closely for Textual Details
    • Fifth Grade: Memoir Writing
    • Fifth Grade: Informational Writing
    • Fifth Grade: Grammar Page!
  • Writing 6
  • Blog
Sixth Grade Writing
Module 2A: Getting the Gist: Steve Jobs Commencement Address

Please note:  The dates regarding homework and classwork are subject to change.  Please check the website each day.
Please see the Homepage for a detailed explanation of procedures and expectations.
To view many amazing videos and resources:
          1) Go to snap.caboces.org. 
          2) Enter your username and password. 
          3) Your username and password is written on the first page in your agenda.
          4) Once you are logged on to SNAP.CABOCES, you can click on to LEARN360,Discovery Education, and BrainPop, for many amazing videos and resources.
          5) After clicking on to LEARN360,Discovery Education, and BrainPop, you can then click on the highlighted links found in the lessons.
Fifth and Sixth Grade Writing Rubric:
3-8.ela.common.core.writing.rubric.pdf
File Size: 255 kb
File Type: pdf
Download File


The following lessons are taken from the NYS Common Core Aligned Curriculum Modules written by Expeditionary Learning. The complete unit, including NYS Common Core Standards can be found on the EngageNY website.

**Please note: Module 2A, Units 1 and 2 are being utilized in Mrs. Beckwith's reading class.
Common Core Standards and Module Overview:
Central Texts: 
  • Christopher Paul Curtis, Bud, Not Buddy (Yearling, 2002), ISBN-13: 978-0440413288.
  • Steve Jobs, “Stanford University Commencement Address,” speech made on June 12, 2005.
  • President Barack Obama, “Back-to-School Speech,” made on September 8, 2009.
    http://www.whitehouse.gov/back-to-school

Writing TaskEssay to Inform: “My Rule to Live By”
After studying the “Rules to Live By” of Bud in Bud, Not Buddy, Steve Jobs (in his commencement address), President Barack Obama (in his address to students), and Rudyard Kipling (in his poem “If”), students will work in “research teams” to conduct a research project related to a specific issue facing their peer group. As a final performance task, students will use this group research as the basis for writing an individual evidence-based essay to inform readers about one of their own “rules to live by.” Students will support their thinking with facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, and examples. As their End of Unit 3 Assessment, students will write their best draft of this essay. They then will self-assess, peer-critique, and receive teacher feedback based on the NYS Grades 6–8 Expository Writing Evaluation Rubric (which they are familiar with from Module 1). Then, for the final performance task, students will revise their essay to create a final draft.

This essay centers on NYSP12 ELA Standards RI.6.1, RI.6.2, W.6.2, W.6.4, W.6.5, W.6.9, L.6.1, and L.6.2.

Guiding Questions and Big Ideas:

  • What are “rules to live by”? 
  • How do people formulate and use “rules” to lead better lives?
  • How do people communicate these “rules” to others? 
  • People develop “rules to live by” through their own life experience.
  • These “rules to live by” are communicated through a variety of literary modes.        

Resources Website Links:

Homework Due Wednesday, October, 22 2014: 
Classwork, Tuesday, October, 21 2014: GRADE 6: MODULE 2A: UNIT 1: LESSON 6: Getting the Gist:Steve Jobs Commencement Address (Focus on Paragraphs 6-8, and connecting to Chapter 6
  • Read the learning targets as a class together.
  • Read paragraph one of Steve Jobs commencement speech.
  • What does this introductory paragraph tell you?
  • What do we learn about Steve Jobs?
  • What is the structure of this speech going to be?
  • Why would he structure it this way?
  • Display the reading closely: Guiding Questions handout. We will be looking at the “Questioning Texts” row of the chart.
  • Which of these questions will help us with our reading to get the gist of Steve Jobs speech?
  • We will read again paragraphs 6-8 of the speech. Students should follow along.
  • What do you understand from his excerpt so far?
  • Students will silently reread paragraph six. Ask “what is the gist of this paragraph? What is this paragraph mostly about?”
  • Write gist in margins and circle unfamiliar words.
  • Students will repeat for paragraphs 7-8. Students will share with class what they wrote down.
  • Go over power point on strategies of finding out the meaning of unfamiliar words.
  • Students should record their new words in the word-catcher.  


Homework Due Thursday, October 23, 2014:  None.
Classwork, Wednesday, October 22, 2014:Lesson 7 Text-Dependent Questions and Choosing Details to Support a Claim: Digging Deeper into Paragraphs 6–8 of Steve Jobs’ Commencement Address (and connecting to Chapter 7)
  • Students will get out their copies of Stanford University Commencement Address: Steve Jobs.
  • Students will get out their copies of Paragraphs 6-8 of the Steve Jobs Speech- Text-Dependent Questions. (Have the Close Reading Guide on the ELMO)
  • Students should open to their evidence based claims graphic organizers. 
  • Claim: “You have to trust that the dots will somehow connect in your future.” (students will write this in their graphic organizer)
  •  What do you think was the question that prompted this claim?
  •  Focusing Question: “What message is Steve Jobs trying to give us in Paragraphs 6-8?”
  •  “How will having an idea of the question help you to find details to support the claim?”  
  • Students will look for details that specifically answer the question in relation to the claim and will annotate their thinking on those details in the margin next to text they have underlined. 
  • Annotate. Underline “I decided to take a calligraphy class…typography great.” In margins write “connects to his future”
  •   Assist students as they begin working on their own. Ask students “How does that detail answer the question and support the claim? What is your thinking behind choosing that detail?”
  •  Students will have to look at all three details to see how all three details support the claim.  
  • Fill-out organizer on the ELMO as a class after students individually complete their organizers. (might have to do for the next class, depending on time.)

Homework Due Thursday, October 23, 2014:  Work on your Halloween writing contest pieces.
Classwork, Wednesday, October 22, 2014:
  • Students will be introduced to a writing contest for a Halloween writing competition.
  • Students can write a poem or fiction essay that is 200-1000 words.
  • The writing piece should be about Halloween.
  • The submission deadline is Tuesday, October, 28, 2014. 
  • Students can hand in their copies of their Halloween pieces into Ms Z.
Homework Due Monday, October 27, 2014: 
Classwork, Friday, October 24, 2014:Lesson 7 Text-Dependent Questions and Choosing Details to Support a Claim: Digging Deeper into Paragraphs 6–8 of Steve Jobs’ Commencement Address (and connecting to Chapter 7)
  • Students will get out their copies of Stanford University Commencement Address: Steve Jobs.
  • Students will get out their copies of Paragraphs 6-8 of the Steve Jobs Speech- Text-Dependent Questions. (Have the Close Reading Guide on the ELMO)
  • Students should open to their evidence based claims graphic organizers. 
  • Claim: “You have to trust that the dots will somehow connect in your future.” (students will write this in their graphic organizer)
  •  What do you think was the question that prompted this claim?
  •  Focusing Question: “What message is Steve Jobs trying to give us in Paragraphs 6-8?”
  •  “How will having an idea of the question help you to find details to support the claim?”  
  • Students will look for details that specifically answer the question in relation to the claim and will annotate their thinking on those details in the margin next to text they have underlined. 
  • Annotate. Underline “I decided to take a calligraphy class…typography great.” In margins write “connects to his future”
  •   Assist students as they begin working on their own. Ask students “How does that detail answer the question and support the claim? What is your thinking behind choosing that detail?”
  •  Students will have to look at all three details to see how all three details support the claim.  
  • Fill-out organizer on the ELMO as a class after students individually complete their organizers. (might have to do for the next class, depending on time.)
Homework Due Tuesday, October 28, 2014:  None.
Classwork, Monday, October 27 , 2014:
  • Students will complete the Forming Evidence-Based Claims graphic organizer. v  Fill-out organizer on the ELMO as a class after students individually complete their organizers. (might have to do for the next class, depending on time.)
  •  Students will have to look at all three details to see how all three details support the claim.
  •  Annotate. Underline “I decided to take a calligraphy class…typography great.” In margins write “connects to his future”
  • Claim: “You have to trust that the dots will somehow connect in your future.” (students will write this in their graphic organizer)
  • What do you think was the question that prompted this claim?
  • Focusing Question: “What message is Steve Jobs trying to give us in Paragraphs 6-8?”
  • As a class we will listen to Stanford Commencement Address: Steve Jobs. Play 05:35-09:00. 
  • After hearing the speech we will read paragraphs 12-14 out loud.
  • Students then will reread paragraph 12 again with a partner, discuss the gist with their partner, write their annotations, and circle any unknown words in the speech.
  • Students will continue to do the same thing for paragraphs 13 and 14: reread, annotate the gist, and circle unfamiliar words. 
  • Students will share the unfamiliar words they circled in paragraphs 12-14. 
  • Ask other students if they know the meaning of words other students say and how they know the meaning. Students will record word in their word catcher for lesson 6.  


Homework Due Wednesday, October 29 , 2014:  None.
Classwork, Tuesday, October 28, 2014:
  • As a class we will listen to Stanford Commencement Address: Steve Jobs. Play 05:35-09:00.
  • After hearing the speech we will read paragraphs 12-14 out loud.
  • Students then will reread paragraph 12 again with a partner, discuss the gist with their partner, write their annotations, and circle any unknown words in the speech.
  • Students will continue to do the same thing for paragraphs 13 and 14: reread, annotate the gist, and circle unfamiliar words. 
  • Students will share the unfamiliar words they circled in paragraphs 12-14. 
  • Ask other students if they know the meaning of words other students say and how they know the meaning. Students will record word in their word catcher for lesson 6.

 
Homework Due Wednesday, October 29 , 2014:  None.
Classwork, Tuesday, October 28, 2014:
  • Students will complete the text dependent questions for paragraphs 12-14.
  • Students will complete the Forming Evidence-Based Claims graphic organizer.
  • Students will make the claim for this section themselves.
  • The claim that the students make need to answer this question: “In paragraph 14, Steve Jobs goes on to tell his audience two thing not to do, beginning his sentences with the word ‘don’t.’ What does paragraph 14 suggest he is trying to tell the graduates?”


Homework Due Friday, October 31 , 2014:  None.
Classwork, Thursday, October 30, 2014:
  • As a class we will listen to Stanford Commencement Address: Steve Jobs. Play 09:00-14:32
  • After hearing the speech we will read paragraphs 20-22 out loud.
  • Display Steve Jobs Commencement Speech. 
  • Students will follow along as a I read paragraphs 20-22. 
  • Students then will reread paragraph 20 again with a partner, discuss the gist with their partner, write their annotations, and circle any unknown words in the speech.
  • Gist for paragraph 20- Steve Jobs is glad he didn’t die, even though he used to think about it. 
  • Gist for paragraph 21- Death is going to happen. Death causes life. 
  • Gist for paragraph 22- Follow your gut to do what you want in life. 
  • Students will share the gist’s that they came up with. 
  • Students will continue to do the same thing for paragraphs 21 and 22:  reread, annotate the gist, and circle unfamiliar words.  
  • Then ask students what is one strategy you used to determine the meaning of unknown words?
  • Students will share the unfamiliar words they circled in paragraphs 20-22. 
  • Ask other students if they know the meaning of words other students say and how they know the meaning. Students will record word in their word catcher for lesson 6.  


Homework Due Monday, November 3 , 2014:  None.
Classwork, Friday, October 31, 2014:
  • As a class we will read The Graves Family by Patrica Polacco. 
  • After reading the book students will think, pair, share their favorite part in the book.
  • Then, students will use on of the following writing prompts to write a short story.
  •  Running down the street with candy flying, I saw.......
  • The black cat started to crouch and his when.......
  • I couldn't believe my eyes when I saw......
  • Something in the closet was making a strange noise, so I opened the closet and......
Homework Due Tuesday, November 4, 2014:  None.
Classwork, Monday, November 3, 2014:
  • Gist for paragraph 21- Death is going to happen. Death causes life. 
  • Gist for paragraph 22- Follow your gut to do what you want in life. 
  • Students will share the gist’s that they came up with. 
  • Students will continue to do the same thing for paragraphs 21 and 22:  reread, annotate the gist, and circle unfamiliar words.  
  • Then ask students what is one strategy you used to determine the meaning of unknown words?
  • Students will share the unfamiliar words they circled in paragraphs 20-22. 
  • Ask other students if they know the meaning of words other students say and how they know the meaning. Students will record word in their word catcher for lesson 6. 
  • Students will complete the text dependent questions for paragraphs 20-22.
  • Students will complete the Forming Evidence-Based Claims graphic organizer.
  • The claim that the students make need to answer this question: Why does Steve Jobs make the puzzling claim in Paragraph 21 that “death is very likely the single best invention of life”? Students can write this question in their graphic organizers.
  • Remind students that I the first box they record their details and in the second box they record their thinking of the details, and in the final box they record the claim.
  • Students will have about ten minutes to fill out their graphic organizers and then they can share them with the whole class.
Homework Due Wednesday, November 5, 2014:  Study for Test. Look over Steve Jobs speech and try answering the text questions again to help prepare you for the test.
Classwork, Tuesday, November 4, 2014:
  • Students will complete the text dependent questions for paragraphs 20-22.
  • Students will complete the Forming Evidence-Based Claims graphic organizer.
  • The claim that the students make need to answer this question: Why does Steve Jobs make the puzzling claim in Paragraph 21 that “death is very likely the single best invention of life”? Students can write this question in their graphic organizers.
  • Remind students that I the first box they record their details and in the second box they record their thinking of the details, and in the final box they record the claim.
  • Students will have about ten minutes to fill out their graphic organizers and then they can share them with the whole class.
  • Students will read paragraphs 15-17 in their Steve Jobs packet.
  • As a class we will fill out a claim graphic organizer to answer the following questions: "What is Steve Jobs trying to tell his audience in paragraphs 15-17?"

Test on Thursday, November 6, 2014
Homework Due Thursday, November 6, 2014:  Study for Test. Look over Steve Jobs speech and try answering the text questions again to help prepare you for the test.
Classwork, Wednesday, November 5, 2014:
  • Students will read paragraphs 15-17 in their Steve Jobs packet.
  • As a class we will fill out a claim graphic organizer to answer the following questions: "What is Steve Jobs trying to tell his audience in paragraphs 15-17?"
  • Students will have to find details that answer the question. Students will find three supporting details.
  • Students will have to connect the details.
  • Students will then have to make a final claim. 
  • Students will start learning about argumentative essays. 
Homework Due Friday, November 7, 2014:  None.
Classwork, Thursday, November 6, 2014:
  • Students will complete a writing assessment.
  • Students will read through a speech.
  • After reading a speech students will answer comprehension questions about the speech.
  • Then students will fill out an evidence based claim graphic organizer.
  • The question for the evidence based claims organizer is "what does president Obama believe students need to do to be successful?"
  • Once students are done they will hand in the test and work silently on any homework that they might have.
6module.overview.and.core.standards.2a.pdf
File Size: 377 kb
File Type: pdf
Download File


6module.overview.and.core.standards.2a.doc
File Size: 277 kb
File Type: doc
Download File


steve_jobs_commencement_speech.pdf
File Size: 256 kb
File Type: pdf
Download File


steve_jobs_commencement_speech.pptx
File Size: 903 kb
File Type: pptx
Download File