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Robert Banks A Mighty Good Way To Start An Essay

Life is a state that distinguishes organisms from non-living objects or dead organisms, being manifested by growth through metabolism and reproduction.

A[edit]

  • It is written that the last enemy to be vanquished is death. We should begin early in life to vanquish this enemy by obliterating every trace of the fear of death from our minds. Then can we turn to life and fill the whole horizon of our souls with it, turn with added zest to all the serious tasks which it imposes and to the pure delights which here and there it affords.
    • Felix Adler, Life and Destiny (1913), Section 8: Suffering and Consolation.
  • Let us learn from the lips of death the lessons of life. Let us live truly while we live, live for what is true and good and lasting. And let the memory of our dead help us to do this. For they are not wholly separated from us, if we remain loyal to them. In spirit they are with us. And we may think of them as silent, invisible, but real presences in our households.
    • Felix Adler, Life and Destiny (1913), Section 8: Suffering and Consolation.
  • The bitter, yet merciful, lesson which death teaches us is to distinguish the gold from the tinsel, the true values from the worthless chaff.
    The terrible events of life are great eye-openers. They force us to learn that which it is wholesome for us to know, but which habitually we try to ignore — namely, that really we have no claim on a long life; that we are each of us liable to be called off at any moment, and that the main point is not how long we live, but with what meaning we fill the short allotted span — for short it is at best.
    • Felix Adler, Life and Destiny (1913), Section 8: Suffering and Consolation.
  • If you will do some deed before you die,
    Remember not this caravan of death,
    But have belief that every little breath
    Will stay with you for an eternity.

B[edit]

  • We live in deeds, not years: in thoughts, not breaths;
    In feelings, not in figures on a dial.
    We should count time by heart-throbs. He most lives
    Who thinks most, feels the noblest, acts the best.
  • It matters not how long we live, but how.
  • Life! we've been long together
    Through pleasant and through cloudy weather;
    Tis hard to part when friends are dear,—
    Perhaps 'twill cost a sigh, a tear.
    Then steal away, give little warning.
    Choose thine own time,
    Say not "Good-night," but in some brighter clime,
    Bid me "Good-morning."
  • One's life has value so long as one attributes value to the life of others, by means of love, friendship, indignation and compassion.
    • Simone de Beauvoir, As quoted in Successful Aging : A Conference Report (1974) by Eric Pfeiffer, p. 142.
  • And so Doctor Beckett finds himself leaping from life to life, striving to put right what once went wrong and hoping each time that his next leap... will be the leap home.
  • For life, with all it yields of joy and woe,
    And hope and fear
    (believe the aged friend),
    Is just our chance o' the prize of learning love,—
    How love might be, hath been indeed, and is.

C[edit]

  • Life is a pageant that passes very quickly, going hastily from one darkness to another darkness with only ignes fatui to guide; and there is no sense in it. I learned that, Kerin, without moiling over books. But life is a fine ardent spectacle; and I have loved the actors in it: and I have loved their youth and high-heartedness, and their ungrounded faiths, and their queer dreams, my Kerin, about their own importance and about the greatness of the destiny that awaited them, — while you were piddling after, of all things, the truth!
    • James Branch Cabell, The Silver Stallion : A Comedy of Redemption (1926), Saraïde, in Book Seven : What Saraïde Wanted, Ch. XLVII : Economics of Saraïde.
  • Life is very marvelous … and to the wonders of the earth there is no end appointed.
    • James Branch Cabell, The Silver Stallion : A Comedy of Redemption (1926), The Gander, in Book Seven : What Saraïde Wanted, Ch. XLV : The Gander Also Generalizes.
  • The realization that life is absurd and cannot be an end, but only a beginning. This is a truth nearly allgreatminds have taken as their starting point. It is not this discovery that is interesting, but the consequences and rules of action drawn from it.
    • Albert Camus, "The Reading Room," Alger Républicain (1938) critiquing Nausea by Jean-Paul Sartre, as quoted in Albert Camus and the Philosophy of the Absurd (2002) by Avi Sagi, p. 43.
  • People who see life as anything more than pure entertainment are missing the point.
  • Well, as you know, there are many things in life that are not fair, that wealthy people can afford and poor people can't. But I don't believe that the Federal Government should take action to try to make these opportunities exactly equal, particularly when there is a moral factor involved.
    • Jimmy Carter, answer to a question asking whether it is fair that women who can afford abortions can get them while women who cannot afford them are precluded, news conference, Washington, D.C. (July 12, 1977). Public Papers of the Presidents of the United States: Jimmy Carter, 1977, book 2, p. 1237.
  • They cut me down
    And I leapt up high;
    I am the life
    That'll never, never die;
    I'll live in you
    If you'll live in me —
    I am the Lord
    Of the Dance, said he.
    • Sydney Carter, Lord of the Dance (1963)
      • The quotes in Lord of the Dance are from the definitive lyrics to original "Lord of the Dance" song which was written to accompany the Shaker tune of "Simple Gifts" by Joseph Brackett. These were later adapted (in either ignorance or denial of the actual origins) without authorization or acknowledgments in the theatrical play "Lord of the Dance", and in other adaptations since.
  • Since life is but a continuous series of experiences, everything ultimately helps me towards my final enlightenment.
    • Sri Chinmoy, Ten Thousand Flower Flames Part 1-100 (1979), #4029, Part 41.
  • You try your damnedest, but something always goes wrong. That’s life. If you’re smart, you plan for it.
  • Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take, but by the moments that take our breath away.
    • Vicki Corona, Tahitian Choreographies (Aug 1, 1989) Dance Fantasy Productions, p. 36 (Discussion).
  • Still ending, and beginning still.
  • What is it but a map of busy life,
    Its fluctuations, and its vast concerns?
  • Life is not easy for any of us. But what of that? We must have perseverance and above all confidence in ourselves. We must believe that we are gifted for something, and that this thing, at whatever cost, must be attained.
    • 'La vie n’est facile pour aucun de nous. Mais quoi, il faut avoir de la persévérance, et surtout de la confiance en soi. Il faut croire que l’on est doué pour quelque chose, et que, cette chose, il faut l'atteindre coûte que coûte.'
      • Marie Curie, As quoted in Madame Curie : A Biography (1937) by Eve Curie Labouisse, p. 69.
  • One is born, one runs up bills, one dies.
    • Richard Curtis (English screenwriter, actor and film director) and Ben Elton (British-Australian comedian and author). Stated by Rowan Atkinson playing Edmund Blackadder in the BBC situation comedy, Blackadder the Third, episode four, 'Amy and Amiability', 1987.

D[edit]

  • Life is an urge of the Universe to understand itself.
    • N. S. Dhami, "A Phrase Steps Out of the Past".
  • Life's a garden, dig it!
  • A dream! What is a dream? And is not our life a dream? I will say more. Suppose that this paradise will never come to pass (that I understand), yet I shall go on preaching it. And yet how simple it is: in one day, in one hour everything could be arranged at once! The chief thing is to love others like yourself, that's the chief thing, and that's everything; nothing else is wanted — you will find out at once how to arrange it all. And yet it's an old truth which has been told and retold a billion times — but it has not formed part of our lives! The consciousness of life is higher than life, the knowledge of the laws of happiness is higher than happiness — that is what one must contend against. And I shall. If only everyone wants it, it can be arranged at once.

E[edit]

  • Life's a vast sea
    That does its mighty errand without fail,
    Painting in unchanged strength though waves are changing.
  • Sooner or later that which is now life shall be poetry, and every fair and manly trait shall add a richer strain to the song.
  • When life is true to the poles of nature, the streams of truth will roll through us in song.
  • So likewise all this life of martall men,
    What is it but a certaine kynde of stage plaie?
    Where men come forthe disguised one in one arraie,
    An other in an other eche plaiying his part.
    • Erasmus, Praise of Folie. Challoner's translation (1549), p. 43.
  • Sometimes I think life is all one long fucking count: We count the hours, the bulls count us, and the head bulls count counts.

F[edit]

  • The sea is only beautiful if there's a shore. Life is like the sea. There'll be a direction to follow even if you sail more than one day or one life... the promise of a new land is your guide, because you know that the sea is a huge world that's beautiful only if there's a shore.
    • Patricky Field, as quoted in Beautiful if there's a shore (2008) song by Patricky Field.
  • There is nothing in the world, I venture to say, that would so effectively help one to survive even the worst conditions, as the knowledge that there is a meaning in one’s life.
    • Viktor Frankl, Man's Search for Meaning, p. 126 in the 1984 Pocket Books edition.
  • I believe that none can "save" his fellow man by making a choice for him. To help him, he can indicate the possible alternatives, with sincerity and love, without being sentimental and without illusion. The knowledge and awareness of the freeing alternatives can reawaken in an individual all his hidden energies and put him on the path to choosing respect for "life" instead of for "death."
    • Erich Fromm, Credo (1965), First published in English in On Being Human (1994) by Erich From, edited by Rainer Funk, pp. 99-105. Full text online.
  • Human beings desire more than small pleasures in the routines of life. We also seek great challenges in the face of death.
  • In three words I can sum up everything I've learned about life — It goes on.
    • Robert Frost, as quoted in The Harper Book of Quotations (1993) edited by Robert I. Fitzhenry, p. 261.
  • Our life runs down in sending up the clock.
    The brook runs down in sending up our life.
    The sun runs down in sending up the brook.
    And there is something sending up the sun.

G[edit]

  • Life is a jest; and all things show it.
    I thought so once; and now I know it.
    • John GayMy Own Epitaph, inscribed on Gay’s monument in Westminster Abbey; also quoted as "I thought so once; but now I know it".
  • I expect to pass through this world but once. Any good therefore that I can do, or any kindness that I can show to any fellow creature, let me do it now. Let me not defer or neglect it, for I shall not pass this way again.
    • Generally attributed to Stephen Grellet, but not found in his published writings. Same idea found in The Spectator. (Addison). No. I, Volume I. March 1. 1710. Canon Jepson positively claimed it for Emerson. Attributed to Edward Courtenay, due to the resemblance of the Earl's epitaph. See Literary World, March 15, 1905. Also to Carlyle, Miss A. B. Hageman, Rowland Hill, Marcus Aurelius.
  • All the bloomy flush of life is fled.
  • The pregnant quarry teem'd with human form.

H[edit]

  • He was, first and last, the born fighter, to whom the consciousness of being matched against a great adversary suffices and who can dispense with success. Life for him was an adventure, perilous indeed, but men are not made for safe havens. The fullness of life is in the hazards of life. And, at the worst, there is that in us which can turn defeat into victory.
    • Edith Hamilton, The Great Age of Greek Literature (1942), p. 243. She was referring to Aeschylus.
  • My secret to a long, healthy life is to always keep working. It keeps me busy and happy, and gives me a reason to stay alive.
  • 'Life is worth Living
    Through every grain of it,
    From the foundations
    To the last edge
    Of the cornerstone, death.'
  • Life — life — let there be life!
    Better a thousand times the roaring hours
    When wave and wind,
    Like the Arch-Murderer in flight
    From the Avenger at his heel,
    Storm through the desolate fastnesses
    And wild waste places of the world!
  • Life — give me life until the end,
    That at the very top of being,
    The battle-spirit shouting in my blood,
    Out of the reddest hell of the fight
    I may be snatched and flung
    Into the everlasting lull,
    The immortal, incommunicable dream.
  • Life — life — life! 'Tis the sole great thing
    This side of death,
    Heart on heart in the wonder of Spring!
  • One doth but break-fast here, another dine; he that lives longest does but suppe; we must all goe to bed in another World.
  • If you need something to worship, then worship life — all life, every last crawling bit of it! We're all in this beauty together!
  • Let all live as they would die.
  • The world is like a ride in an amusement park, and when you choose to go on it you think it's real because that's how powerful our minds are. The ride goes up and down, around and around, it has thrills and chills, and it's very brightly colored, and it's very loud, and it's fun for a while. Many people have been on the ride a long time, and they begin to wonder, "Hey, is this real, or is this just a ride?" And other people have remembered, and they come back to us and say, "Hey, don't worry; don't be afraid, ever, because this is just a ride." And we … kill those people. "Shut him up! I've got a lot invested in this ride, shut him up! Look at my furrows of worry, look at my big bank account, and my family. This has to be real." It's just a ride. But we always kill the good guys who try and tell us that, you ever notice that? And let the demons run amok … But it doesn't matter, because it's just a ride. And we can change it any time we want. It's only a choice. No effort, no work, no job, no savings of money. Just a simple choice, right now, between fear and love. The eyes of fear want you to put bigger locks on your doors, buy guns, close yourself off. The eyes of love instead see all of us as one. Here's what we can do to change the world, right now, to a better ride.' Take all that money we spend on weapons and defenses each year and instead spend it feeding and clothing and educating the poor of the world, which it would pay for many times over, not one human being excluded, and we could explore space, together, both inner and outer, forever, in peace.
  • The life so short, the craft so long to learn.
    • Hippocrates, Aphorisms, I. i
      Often translated in Latin as:
      Ars longa, vita brevis.
  • No arts; no letters; no society; and which is worst of all, continual fear, and danger of violent death; and the life of man, solitary, poor, nasty, brutish, and short.
  • O Damsel Dorothy! Dorothy Q.!
    Strange is the gift that I owe to you;
    Such a gift as never a king
    Save to daughter or son might bring,—
    All my tenure of heart and hand,
    All my title to house and land;
    Mother and sister and child and wife
    And joy and sorrow and death and life!
    • Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr., "Dorothy Q"., stanza 5, in The Poetical Works of Oliver Wendell Holmes (1975), p. 187. Dorothy Quincy was Holmes's great-grandmother, and, as he explained in a head-note to the poem, p. 186–87, "the daughter of Judge Edmund Quincy, and the aunt of Josiah Quincy, junior, the young patriot and orator who died just before the American Revolution, of which he was one of the most eloquent and effective promoters".
  • We have really lost in our society the sense of the sacredness of life.
  • Rather than accept the fantastically small probability of life having arisen through the blind forces of nature, it seemed better to suppose that the origin of life was a deliberate intellectual act.

I[edit]

J[edit]

  • Death's got to be easy, because life is hard. It'll leave you physically, mentally, and emotionally scarred.
  • It is only by risking our persons from one hour to another that we live at all. And often enough our faith beforehand in an uncertified result is the only thing that makes the result come true.
    • William James, in "Is Life Worth Living?" The Will to Believe and Other Essays in Popular Philosophy (1897).
  • Be not afraid of life. Believe that life is worth living, and your belief will help create the fact.
    • William James, in "Is Life Worth Living?" The Will to Believe and Other Essays in Popular Philosophy (1897).
  • Your time is limited, so don't waste it living someone else's life. Don't be trapped by dogma — which is living with the results of other people's thinking. Don't let the noise of others' opinions drown out your own inner voice. And most important, have the courage to follow your heart and intuition. They somehow already know what you truly want to become. Everything else is secondary.
    • Steve Jobs, Address at Stanford University (12 June, 2005).
  • I am the resurrection and the life. The one who exercises faith in me, even though he dies, will come to life; and everyone who is living and exercises faith in me will never die at all.
  • Now this is eternal life: that they may know you, the only true God, and Jesus Christ, whom you have sent.
    • Jesus, John 17:3 (NIV).
    • Variants:
    • And this is life eternal, that they might know thee the only true God, and Jesus Christ, whom thou hast sent.
    • This means everlasting life, their taking in knowledge of you, the only true God, and of the one whom you sent forth, Jesus Christ.
  • Life is a pill which none of us can bear to swallow without gilding.

K[edit]

  • Azazel: You've been on the force so long you think you've seen it all, but you haven't. 'Cause life's always got one more surprise for you. And sometimes, it's a big one.
  • I compare human life to a large mansion of many apartments, two of which I can only describe, the doors of the rest being as yet shut upon me.
  • Love will come find you
    Just to remind you
    Of who you are
    [...] See that's the thing about love
    [...] Then life
    It will embrace you
    Totally amaze you
    So you don't give up
  • Ah Love! could you and I with him conspire
    To grasp this sorry Scheme of Things entire
    Would we not shatter it to bits—and then
    Re-mould it nearer to the Heart's Desire?
  • Think, in this batter'd Caravanserai
    Whose portals are alternate Night and Day,
    How Sultan after Sultan with his Pomp
    Abode his destin'd Hour and went his way.
  • A Moment's Halt—a momentary taste
    Of BEING from the Well amid the Waste—
    And, Lo! the phantom Caravan has reach'd
    The NOTHING it set out from. Oh, make haste!
  • But helpless Pieces of the Game He plays
    Upon this Checker-board of Nights and Days;
    Hither and thither moves, and checks, and slays,
    And one by one back in the Closet lays.
  • And fear not lest Existence closing your
    Account should lose or know the type no more:
    The Eternal Sáki from that Bowl has poured
    Millions of Bubbles like us and will pour.
  • Hatred paralyzes life; love releases it. Hatred confuses life; love harmonizes it. Hatred darkens life; love illuminates it.
    • Martin Luther King, Jr., Strength to Love (1963), Last paragraph of section III of Antidotes for fear, page 122 (see link at top of the section).
  • If you are eating well and your condition is pure and clean, life itself becomes like the dreams or visions that you have when sleeping.

L[edit]

  • Oh, Life ! — the wearisome, the vexatious — whose pleasures are either placed beyond our reach, or within it when we no longer desire them — when youth toils for the riches, age may possess but not enjoy ; — where we trust to friendship, one light word may destroy ; or to love, that dies even of itself; — where we talk of glory, philosophical, literary, military, political — die, or, what is much more, live for it — and this coveted possession dwells in the consent of men of whom no two agree about it.
  • Yes! Life is a banquet, and most poor sons-of-bitches are starving to death! Live!
    • Jerome Lawrence and Robert Edwin Lee, Auntie Mame, act II, scene vi (1957). Auntie Mame is speaking. Based on the novel of the same title by Patrick Dennis.
  • Time means a lot to me because, you see, I, too, am also a learner and am often lost in the joy of forever developing and simplifying. If you love life, don't waste time, for time is what life is made up of.
    • Bruce Lee, Striking Thoughts (2000), p. 10; Here Lee paraphrases a much older English proverb: If you care for life, don't waste your time; for time is what life is made of. (as quoted in Bordighera and the Western Riviera (1883) by Frederick Fitzroy Hamilton, p. 189).
  • The mystery of life is not a problem to be solved; it is a reality to be experienced.
    • Jacobus Johannes Leeuw, The Conquest of Illusion (1928), p. 9
  • Life is what happens to you while you're busy making other plans.
  • Hey, hey, hey. A life. A life, Jimmy. Do you know what that is? It's the shit that happens while you're waiting for moments that never come.
    • Lester Freamon to Jimmy McNulty, The Wire.
  • Life — a culmination of the past, an awareness of the present, an indication of a future beyond knowledge, the quality that gives a touch of divinity to matter.
  • What shall we call this undetermin'd state,
    This narrow isthmus 'twixt two boundless oceans,
    That whence we came, and that to which we tend?
    • George Lillo, Arden of Feversham (performed in 1759), Act III, scene 2.
  • This life of ours is a wild æolian harp of many a joyous strain,
    But under them all there runs a loud perpetual wail, as of souls in pain.
  • My life, I live to the limit and I love it.
    • Jennifer Lopez, "I'm Real (Murder Remix)" (2001).

M[edit]

  • "In the midst of life we are in death," said one; it is more true that in the midst of death we are in life. Life is the only reality; what men call death is but a shadow — a word for that which cannot be — a negation, owing the very idea of itself to that which it would deny. But for life there could be no death. If God were not, there would not even be nothing. Not even nothingness preceded life. Nothingness owes its very idea to existence.
Rather than accept the fantastically small probability of life having arisen through the blind forces of nature, it seemed better to suppose that the origin of life was a deliberate intellectual act.
Fred Hoyle
It was said that life was cheap in Ankh-Morpork. This was, of course, completely wrong. Life was often very expensive; you could get death for free. ~ Terry Pratchett in Pyramids
The terrible events of life are great eye-openers. They force us to learn that which it is wholesome for us to know, but which habitually we try to ignore — namely, that really we have no claim on a long life; that we are each of us liable to be called off at any moment, and that the main point is not how long we live, but with what meaning we fill the short allotted span — for short it is at best. ~ Felix Adler
Life, with all it yields of joy and woe,
And hope and fear [...]
Is just our chance o' the prize of learning love,—
How love might be, hath been indeed, and is. ~ Robert Browning
I am the life
That'll never, never die;
I'll live in you
If you'll live in me —
I am the Lord
Of the Dance, said he. ~ Sydney Carter
Since life is but a continuous series of experiences, everything ultimately helps me towards my final enlightenment. ~ Sri Chinmoy
Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take, but by the moments that take our breath away. ~ Vicki Corona.
Life is not easy for any of us. But what of that? We must have perseverance and above all confidence in ourselves. We must believe that we are gifted for something, and that this thing, at whatever cost, must be attained. ~ Marie Curie
For with you is the source of life;
By light from you we can see light. ~ David
When life is true to the poles of nature, the streams of truth will roll through us in song. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson
Life is like the sea. There'll be a direction to follow even if you sail more than one day or one life... the promise of a new land is your guide, because you know that the sea is a huge world that's beautiful only if there's a shore. ~ Patricky Field
Our life runs down in sending up the clock.
The brook runs down in sending up our life.
The sun runs down in sending up the brook.
And there is something sending up the sun. ~ Robert Frost
It is the law of life that if you are kind to someone you feel happy.  If you are cruel you are unhappy.  And if you hurt someone, you will be hurt back. ~ Cary Grant
The fullness of life is in the hazards of life. And, at the worst, there is that in us which can turn defeat into victory. ~ Edith Hamilton
Life is worth Living
Through every grain of it,
From the foundations
To the last edge
Of the cornerstone, death. ~ William Ernest Henley
If you need something to worship, then worship life — all life, every last crawling bit of it! We're all in this beauty together! ~ Frank Herbert
Be not afraid of life. Believe that life is worth living, and your belief will help create the fact. ~ William James
Your time is limited, so don't waste it living someone else's life. ~ Steve Jobs
Love will come find you
Just to remind you
Of who you are
[...] See that's the thing about love
[...] Then life
It will embrace you
Totally amaze you
So you don't give up ~ Alicia Keys
And fear not lest Existence closing your
Account should lose or know the type no more:
The Eternal Sáki from that Bowl has poured
Millions of Bubbles like us and will pour. ~ Omar Khayyam
Hatred paralyzes life; love releases it. Hatred confuses life; love harmonizes it. Hatred darkens life; love illuminates it. ~ Martin Luther King
If you love life, don't waste time, for time is what life is made up of. ~ Bruce Lee
The mystery of life is not a problem to be solved; it is a reality to be experienced. ~ Jacobus Johannes Leeuw
Life — a culmination of the past, an awareness of the present, an indication of a future beyond knowledge, the quality that gives a touch of divinity to matter. ~ Charles Lindbergh
What counts in life is not the mere fact that we have lived. It is what difference we have made to the lives of others that will determine the significance of the life we lead. ~ Nelson Mandela
Life comes from physical survival; but the good life comes from what we care about. ~ Rollo May

Manasseh and The United States

An Essay

By Rev. Joseph Wild, D. D.

Extracts from a pamphlet published by the Reverend Joseph Wild in 1882. This is one of the most famous pieces published by the British-Israel movement. We reprint it here for your reading enjoyment. Wild is also widely known for his "The Ten Lost Tribes," 1883, London: Robert Banks, Printer, Racquet Court, Fleet Street, E.C.

- - - - - - - - - -

No one interested in the course of human events can reasonably afford to be indifferent of the history of the United States, for in the future history of the world, this country has to play a prominent and successful part...For the past century the population has been doubled every twenty-five years:... The tyrannies and intolerance of the past make us blush for our sires, because their opportunities were so grand and the results so feeble...

FOR WHOM DID GOD INTEND THIS COUNTRY?

and what is the Divine ideal belonging to it? in answering these two questions we will need to go back to the beginning of our race, not simply to the Pilgrims and Puritans, but back still, for these folks were Pilgrims and Puritans before they came to this country… These people had their own ideas very distinctly defined politically, socially, and religiously, and they were to the rest of England as offensive as their ideas were distinct. But whence came their ideas, and how came they to be distinct? Divine adaptation reigns through all known creation... Primary differences respond to nature and Providence, and in this they make known to us the intentions [of the] Creator, both through man and beast.

The Pilgrims and Puritans stand for a peculiar character, a regular sui generis, a character who in form and habit, in speech and manners, and in ideals and practice, is in some degree in contrast with the rest of mankind. But again we ask, How came he by these distinct traits?... ”God speaks once, yea, twice, and man perceiveth it not”. The great and mighty rivers...have their rise and origin far back inland... A knowledge of the beginning enables us to analyse the waters, forecast the course, and see the end. So a knowledge of

OUR ORIGIN

will enable us to judge more correctly of our work and place among the nations. A true conception of the beginning will give us a prospective view of our destiny and end.

Let us travel back… to the place of our birth...back some 3,500 years… About this time Egypt was great and prosperous, well versed in astronomy, agriculture, architecture, and sociology. There are two kings on the same throne- Pharaoh and Joseph. This Joseph had risen to power and honour from the humble position of a slave. He was the eleventh son of the Hebrew Patriarch Jacob, and the first-born of Rachel, his beloved wife.

His father and brethren were sojourning with him at this time. He had married into the priestly family of Potiphera, by taking for his wife, Asenath. Joseph was known in Egypt by the name of Zaphnath-paaneah, which meant the revealer of secrets. Of his children, two sons are brought to special notice. Let us now repair to the death-bed of the venerable Patriarch Jacob, and listen to the benedictions given and prophecies uttered. He first recounts to Joseph how God had appeared to him at a place called Luz, and how and what the Almighty had promised to him and his seed after him.

Then he says, “Thy two sons, Ephraim and Manasseh, which were born unto thee in the land of Egypt before I came unto thee in Egypt are mine: as Reuben and Simeon, they are mine”. These two grandsons the old Patriarch adopted, making them joint-heirs with his own sons. It is very important that we thoroughly understand the nature of this will, what it contains as to time, men, and things, and what the distinction was with respect to Ephraim and Manasseh. Having ascertained this, we must then follow in

THE FOOTSTEPS OF EPHRAIM AND MANASSEH

on the line of history relative thereto, to see if the said will has been executed and fulfilled. the whole will was entailed, even to the end of time, in the bounds of the tribe. it was tribable in its clauses- that is, what was said to each of the twelve sons as well as to Ephraim and Manasseh was to descend to the Tribe, and belong to the Tribe, and be characteristic of the Tribe. This is even true of the children of the concubines of Jacob…

Take for an illustration the case of Ishmael, the brother of Isaac, and son of Abraham; indeed the first-born of Abraham, and we find that the Angel of the Lord said concerning him: “And he shall be a wild man; his hand will be against every man, and every man’s hand against him and he shall dwell in the presence of all his brethren” (Gen. xvi.12). Now it will be apparent to all that such a prediction was tribal and national. It is not only Ishmael that will be wild and free, but that his descendants will be. Ishmael will re-live and re-appear in his seed after him. And will one conversant at all with history deny that these preditions have been literally fulfilled, even to this day? The ...Arab... is proud to claim Ishmael as his father. Will any one be bold enough to claim that the angelic predictions touching Ishmael should be spiritualised? Nay, verily not, because the land and the people are literal facts which none can hide away or truthfully deny…

Remembering these facts, let us examine

THE WILL OF JACOB MADE TO EPHRAIM AND MANASSEH

but with special reference to Manasseh. The language of Scripture recording the same is inimitable… Genesis 48;8-22:

“And Israel beheld Joseph’s sons, and said, Who are these?

“And Joseph said unto his father, They are my sons, whom God has given me in this place, And he said, Bring them, I pray you, unto me, and I will bless them.

“Now the eyes of Israel were dim for age, so that he could not see. And he brought them near unto him; and he kissed them, and he embraced them.

“And Israel said unto Joseph, I had not thought to see your face; and lo, God has shewed me also your seed.

“And Joseph brought them out from between his knees, and he bowed himself with his face to the earth.

“And Joseph took them both, Ephraim in his right hand towards Israel’s left hand, and Manasseh in his left hand towards Israel’s right hand, and brought them near unto him.

“And Israel stretched out his right hand, and laid it upon Ephraim’s head, who was the younger, and his left hand upon Manasseh’s head, guiding his

hand wittingly; for Manasseh was the first-born.

“And he blessed Joseph, and said, God, before whom my fathers Abraham and Isaac did walk, the God which fed me all my life long until this day,

“The Angel which redeemed me from all evil, bless the lads; and let my name be named on them, and the name of my fathers Abraham and Isaac; and let them grow into a multitude in the midst of the earth.

“And when Joseph saw that his father laid his right hand upon the head of Ephraim, it displeased him; and he held up his father’s hand, to remove it from Ephraim’s head unto Manasseh’s head.

“And Joseph said unto his father, Not so, my father; for this is the first-born; put thy right hand upon his head.

“And his father refused, and said, I know it, my son, I know it: he also shall be great: but truly his younger brother shall be greater than he, and his seed shall become a multitude of nations.

“And he blessed them that day, saying, In you shall Israel bless, saying, God make you as Ephraim and as Manasseh, and he set Ephraim before Manasseh.

“And Israel said unto Joseph, Behold, I die; but God shall be with you, and bring you again unto the land of your fathers.

“Moreover I have given to, you one portion above your brethren, which I took out of the hand of the Amorite with my sword, and with my bow. (Genesis 48;8-22).

Here, I believe, we have the origin of the American nation; here we have welded out the first Puritan...And as in Ishmael and Esau’s case, we find a literalness, so in this case.…

The old Patriarch was evidently guided by Heaven in blessing the lads. It was not the will of Joseph that Ephraim should precede Manasseh. Joseph

tried to rectify it, he made objection, and tried to change the hands of his father. The old Patriarch had crossed his hands, and in that position they made a cross, what is now called St. Andrew’s cross. You will also see that if you fold the cross together from the center, you have the shape of the Pyramid. The St. Andrew’s cross is nearly like the letter X. A portion of the Scotch are from Joseph, hence their plaid of many colours and the St.

Andrew’s cross. You will observe that Joseph put his two sons in the right

position , before his father - namely, Manasseh, his oldest son, on the right hand , and Ephraim, the youngest on the left hand - but Jacob’s crossing his hands changed the whole purpose of Joseph. Nor would the old Patriarch yield, though importuned by Joseph to do so. There surely was a Providence in the whole proceeding. The birthright, and preference, and pre-eminence was given to Ephraim. We should remember that Ephraim became

the representative of all national and political blessing, for he not only was set before Manasseh, but he was set before Rueben, the first-born of the twelve sons, as we read in 1 Chron. v.1.:”Now the sons of Reuben, the first-born of Israel (for he was the first-born, but forasmuch as he defiled his father’s bed, his birthright was given unto the sons of Joseph, the son of Israel; and the genealogy is not to be reckoned after the birthright. For Judah prevailed above his brethren, and of him came the chief ruler; but the

birthright was Joseph’s).”

The plain meaning of this passage is, that all political blessings will flow down through Joseph’s sons; they will have most liberty, and be the most prosperous of the nations of the earth; in them all the nations of the earth will be blessed temporarily… in Judah all the nations of the earth will be blessed spiritually. The inference is

clearly this, that if England stands for Ephraim, and the United States for Manasseh, why then politically, they must be superior to all other nations.

Other nations must get better as they imitate and practise after England and America. Through Judah was to come the best Saviour and best religion… The religion from Judah, and political freedom of Ephraim and Manasseh, will very generally go hand in hand. The temporal blessings falling to Ephraim and Manasseh as representatives are, that Ephraim was to be a nation and company of nations… while

MANASSEH IS A PEOPLE AND A GREAT

PEOPLE

And as recorded in Deut. xxxiii. 17, “His glory is like the firstlings of his bullock, and his horns are like the horns of unicorns; with them he shall push the people together unto the ends of the earth; and they are the ten thousands of Ephraim, and they are the thousands of Manasseh”. This very thing these two nations have done and are doing.

To better comprehend what follows, let me state a few facts preparatory: About B.C. 980, the kingdom of Israel was divided; nine tribes went off and formed what is afterwards called the kingdom of Israel. Their first king was Jeroboam, their last was Hoshea. This kingdom continued about 250 years. They were carried captive into Assyria about B.C. 725… The Tribes are called the Ten Lost Tribes. The other part of the whole kingdom of Israel contained the Tribes of Judah, Levi, and Benjamin. It was called the kingdom of Judah.

Ever after this the Jews and Israelites were a distinct people, and have remained so to this day... The Tribes were to disappear from view for a time, then come to the fore as inheritors of… blessings. and they and the Jews are to be joined together in the latter days. The Jews have never been lost… Their history and course through the ages is very different from that of Israel.… the Saxon race are these Ten Lost Tribes. Among them was hid this Tribe of Manasseh, and as the prophecies began to fulfill on the line of Ephraim, so it would naturally follow that those having reference to Manasseh would. As pointed out by the prophets, the home of Israel, when coming to view, would be in some islands, for in the islands they were to rest and renew their strength.

These islands we take to be the British. The place would, after resting,...get too narrow for them, hence they will throw off the surplus by emigration. But they are first to lose some of their own children - namely the Manassehites: “The children which thou shalt have, after thou hast lost the other, shall say again in thine ears, The place is too strait for me, give place to me that I may dwell” (Isa. xlix. 19). Now God had in reserve this country for them, for, geographically speaking, the whole world is laid out in reference to Israel. “When the Most High divided to the nations their inheritance - when He separated the sons of Adam, He set the bounds of the people according to the number of the children of Israel” (Deut. xxxii; 8). This same idea is frequently set forth in the Divine Book… the settlement of America was neither accidental as to time nor persons.

When

MANASSEH’S BIRTH TIME OF A SEPARATION

drew near, he began to get restless; and that his brethren might see him and he learn to know his own, Providence permitted them to come to the surface under Cromwell, and for several years Manasseh stood forth in separate character. The people asked Cromwell to be their king, for as yet they knew not the grand purpose of Providence; he refused, well he might, for this people are to choose their rulers from among themselves, and their nobles and governors are to proceed from the midst of them, as the prophets had foretold. This English Cromwell was only a successor of Gideon and Jephthah and other democratic leaders of the Tribe of Manasseh.

When this Tribe was first settled , they were divided in their own land ; half of them stayed on the East of the Jordan and took to farming, the other half preferred exploring and trading. They had a great desire for more land- a desire natural to Americans to this day. They complained to Joshua saying, “Why hast thou given me but one lot, and but one portion to inherit, seeing I am a great people?” And Joshua told them if they were a great people to go and clear land for themselves and drive out the giants from the mountains and wooded country of the Perizzites. And again “Joshua spake unto the House of Joseph, even to Ephraim and Manasseh, saying, Thou art a great power, and hast great power ; thou shalt not have one lot, only” (Josh. xvii. 17)… What people on the face of the earth can say as naturally as we can, “We are a great people”?

It is in this Tribe, too, that we find the first Woman’s Rights movement. The daughters of Zelphehad petitioned the State Council for the privilege to vote. No wonder that the Woman’s Rights Movement should be so prominent amongst us. You will remember that Manasseh counted as a Tribe, made thirteen Tribes. So when he settles down to real independence and distinction , he federates thirteen States. He represents these symbolically by thirteen white stars in a field of blue, to signify that they were under Heaven’s protection. He chooses the eagle as his bird of symbolism. This bird formed one of the four faces of the cherubim. And the Almighty often reminded His children that He had cared for them as the eagle cared for its young. When the Twelve Tribes were camped in four squares, the banners outside of the battalions presented the face of a man, ox, eagle, and lion...

Let any one examine

THE GREAT SEAL OF THE UNITED STATES,

and study its design… facts, providence, and prophecies do so wonderfully agree. Take the obverse side. Here you have an eagle… in its beak a scroll, inscribed with a motto, “E pluribus Unum.” One out of many, as Manasseh was... and as the country is building up a grand nationality and oneness… But it is on the reverse side of the Great Seal that we have a wonder. Here we have an unfinished pyramid… exactly the same as the Great Pyramid in Egypt is at this day.........(Isa. xix. 19): “In that day shall there be an altar to the LORD. And it shall be for a sign and for a witness unto the Lord of Hosts in the land of Egypt.” Now it is somewhat singular that the Congress of 1782 should have adopted so remarkable a sign, one that would witness to God and tell of their origin. The reverse side is the underside , and shows from whence the nation came, and on what it is built… The suggestions of items upon the Great Seal were from St.John Prestwich, Bart, an Englishman. He gave the suggestions to the American Minister, John Adams, and thence the same were conveyed to Congress and adopted.

...When the Tribes marched, Benjamin, Ephraim, and Manasseh went together, on the West side of the ark, for their homes were Westward. On their battalion banner was the figure of a youth...

...The word Manasseh in Hebrew is Nenasseh, from Nasshane, and means forgetting. So England and America will be friends, for Manasseh will forget and forgive.

And at the same time Ephraim at Waterloo conquered a world’s peace, changed the course and destiny of nations. Ephraim calls us brother Jonathan. All the other colonies are called sisters. Jonathan was of Benjamin. We speak of ourselves as a people. We begin our laws of enactment “We, the people of the United States.” How Manasseh-like it is ! Other nations legislate by the name of their rulers or the name of their nation. We called England, John Bull, the very thing that Ephraim was compared to in the Bible. Ephraim was spoken of as an heifer, and this word in Hebrew is Engle. Of him it was said he should go forth and grow as calves in the stalls—Ka Engli.

The division of the Tribe away back, accounts for the difference between the Pilgrims and Puritans, between the North and South. When we remember that Manasseh was deprived of his birthright, it is no wonder that he set his face against kings, titles, and monarchical forms of government. This disposition was handed down.

To know our destiny, we must study the prophecies relating to Manasseh… When the Tribes return to occupy, by representation, Palestine, we find Manasseh has her lot and place. I can only wish that the glorious truth committed to our keeping may be cherished, and that we, as a nation, may work out our God-assigned task. The future has work and some trouble in reserve, but if we are faithful… we need fear no evil...

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